Friday, December 27, 2019

Mississippi Gulf Coast Marathon, Marathon #12, State #8

What was awesome about this race:
* The T-shirt was wonderfully soft, one of my very favorites.
* The course was sunny but not ever hot. There was a nice breeze at all times that helped it not become hot, ever.
*EVERYONE from the race directors to the volunteers were just so accommodating and lovely. Loved each and every one of them!!! I'd go back just to thank them all over again.
* Their choice of electrolytes and nutrition was easy on the stomach and now my new choice of electrolytes.
* The ease in which to get to start line (yellow busses as shuttles)
* The music at the start line was awesome!!


What could be improved:
* This was a race, I felt, primarily suited for the mudpack and front runners. Lots of BQ seekers in the crowd. As a back, back of the packer, I did not see many people that looked like me.
* I assumed the expo would be larger and would sell KT tape and GU so I did not pack those things. I ended up having to borrow them from a fellow runner.
* The course seriously needs to not have that loop at the end, so that the last runners do not run into trouble once the roads open back up.



The hotel I stayed at, Beau Rivage, was dressed for the holidays. 



Blast from the past!

Even a waving Santa!!


This is the location for the expo. It was small but the items in it were great. 
You know you are in the south when you see trees like these....anyone who knows me knows I lOOOOVVVEEE trees. 

I was just drooling over the greens.....in December!!

Heather and I tried to go to Whole Foods, and this is where Waze took us...LOL.... 

Some sightseeing....




A ceramics studio.....











We finally make it to the hotel and are ready to relax for the evening. 

Below us, casinos are just beginning. 

Alarm goes off on Sunday and this is me trying to look "ready"

Eerie sight. Runners waiting at dawn for portages-potties. 
And the sun finally rises....and its time to start...

The sun peeks through the clouds and into the horizon. 

I only see a few hundred runners for the full.....gulp. 
Police escort for the first 13 miles..... 
Heather helping me make the last few yards....

so freaking glad it's over

#12 done.... now I seriously need to work on getting faster because I do not plan on being last-ish ever again. 


Best part of racing is after racing.... a well-deserved bath!!!

Ready to catch my plane and taking silly pics. 

I am going to miss all this decor....


Goodbye Mississippi!! View from my hotel. 


Thursday, December 26, 2019

Notes one training for a 48 hour race

First,  I should explain what my goal is. My goal is to do 101 miles within this time frame, no more, no less. Once I complete this milage I plan to stop. Below are my notes from my online research into how to train for this.....

*  Plan for one or more naps of 30 minutes to several hours. 
*  Have a person wake you
*  Run until you can't keep eyes open anymore. 
Scheduled walking breaks 
* maybe 15 minute run, 5 walk? (one option) Or, "power-walk a mile every half hour."
* Start conservatively and end strong 
* Eat small portions to avoid stomach problems 
* Add Electrolyte solution that agrees with you
* Second night is the toughest- hallucinations 
* It will show you your weakest part of your body 
* Take a few days off work 
* Immunity will be greatly reduced for several weeks after (note to self-maybe juice a lot before)
* "I am on record as noting that a lot of finishing or persevering in ultras, particularly at 100mi, is between the ears, not below the waist."
* "all I really need is about 15 minutes sleep to clear the brain" and "naps of 10-15 minutes are all you need.
for me, one of those was usually sufficient for 48 hours." * "....the idea of sleeping and waking up really sore and stiff is correct. the idea that you wont get moving again is incorrect."
* ".....you dont have to go fast, but you need to go as much as possible."
* sleep deprivation is the hardest part 
Fight the impulse to rack up miles early. 
* Incorporate walking breaks from the start to keep your legs as fresh as possible. 
* Stick with your race strategy. Eat and drink adequate calories.
* "the feeling of “we’re all in this mess together” is intense."
* "I escaped completely chaffe-free thanks to frequently reapplying Body Glide and changing into clean clothes every now and then. My feet were in pretty good shape. I changed my lightweight socks and covered my feet with Skin Glide every 8-ish hours"



Sources:thank you!!
*http://marathonandbeyond.com/choices/HAGEN2.htm
* http://stevetursi.blogspot.com/2010/04/48-hour-strategy.html
* https://www.insider.com/global-running-day-ultra-runner-how-to-run
*  https://www.runnersworld.com/advanced/a20813009/ask-the-coaches-strategy-for-a-200-mile-race/
* https://gregsalvesen.com/2015/04/06/getting-loopy-at-the-pickled-feet-48-hour/

Saturday, September 28, 2019

The weekly long run, the battle between mind and body

Mind and the body.... who is in control?
The morning of a long run the body is screaming, 
"I cannot do this, let's just go back to bed and curl up and sleep."
The last hour of a long run my mind is triumphantly celebrating having proved the body wrong. 
Tomorrow I am hoping for it to be such a day...
I have 18 miles planned and who knows how this will get done but all arrangements will be made to get this in motion. 

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Doing the right thing is easy

                      Doing the right thing is easy and clear, when you don't make a decision filled with fear. I belong to too many teacher pages on FB and in one of them a woman posts a question. Should she report her coworker for verbally and physically abusing the kids they both care for and risk losing her job. Making this decision is super easy once you know how to make decisions. All decisions made out of fear are by nature, fogged. So one must put aside all fear to be able to clearly see what is the best decision for all situations. 

                      As a runner, I have experienced very little fear running alone in the dark mornings. In fact, I have always felt perfectly at home running, alone, as a woman. Now, the trails at night, that is another story. Yet, the other night, in an attempt to run 16 miles starting at 3:30pm, a friend and I got caught in the pitch darkness of the woods. With the exception of frogs suddenly filling in the trail as it began to cool, I felt perfectly fine running in the trails.....as long as I was with someone. Whether or not I'd venture there, in the dark, on my own is another story. 

                         On that note, I am finishing my wine and heading off to bed to try to get a run before work in the morning. Happy runs!